Test Yourself for Lupus

Because many Lupus symptoms mimic other illnesses, and because symptoms come and go, Lupus can be difficult to diagnose. Currently, there is no single laboratory test that can determine whether a person has Lupus or not. A blood test called an ANA is the best diagnostic test for SLE. Therefore, a physician must evaluate each person to determine whether the presenting symptoms, lab test results and physical findings add up to a positive diagnosis.

Test Yourself for Lupus

  1. Have you ever had achy, painful and/or swollen joints for more than three months?
  2. Do your fingers and/or toes become pale, blue or purple, and numb or uncomfortable in the cold?
  3. Have you had any sores in your mouth for more than two weeks?
  4. Have you ever been told that you have a low blood count – anemia, low white cell count or a low platelet count?
  5. Have you ever had a prominent redness or color change in the shape of a butterfly across the bridge of your nose and cheeks?
  6. Have you ever had an unexplained fever over 100 degrees for more than a few days?
  7. Have you ever had a sensitivity to the sun where your skin “breaks out” after being in the sun (not a sunburn)?
  8. Have you ever had chest pain with breathing for more than a few days (pleurisy)?
  9. Have you ever been told you have protein in your urine?
  10. Have you ever experienced persistent, extreme fatigue and weakness for days or even weeks at a time, even after 6-8 hours of restful night-time sleep?

If you answered “yes” to at least three of these questions, there is a possibility you may have Lupus. We suggest you call your doctor or the Lupus Foundation of Colorado to discuss any questions you may have about Lupus.